Between life and death

I use to find death an extremely terrifying subject and I’m pretty sure I’m joined with the same sentiments by plenty of others. I’ve never really had to deal with losing a loved one directly (knock on wood). But I’ve witnessed many of my dear ones mourn after losing someone they love. Through this, I’ve seen enough to know that the grievance is like an open fresh wound that takes a long time to heal and, maybe the healing stage is never complete. Whether it’s a family, friend or even a pet, death does a lot to those that remain on earth.

I’m not sure if all children grew up feeling frightened of death after a night’s thought of “losing mum or dad”, but I did. I was one of those children that had a hard time understanding and accepting my religion and the concept of life, death and reincarnation. There would be nights where I’d be in tears after thinking the worst. I’d question, “What if I don’t ever see them again?” or “What if I don’t get reincarnated with the same people I love?” It was a weird feeling. Death to me was complicated and religion just made things worse.

But as much as it’s still somewhat terrifying, my idea on it has transitioned. Instead of seeing it as a dreadful part of reality that you eventually face sooner or later, I’ve come to accept it as a close to the many chapters in a person’s life. All that remains of an individual after their final chapter is their story, a homage to one’s life through the scattered pieces of memories that’s left – letters, photographs, videos, and other remnants of that, once, human being. These are the aspects of your life that eventually live on as you die. It gets you wondering, how do you want to be remembered on this earth?

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3 thoughts on “Between life and death

  1. Jen says:

    Interesting. My response to death has grown, and i guess matured. But I find that it’s still shifting and imagine it will continue. I, too, was always worried about something bad happening to my parents when I was a kid (now that fear has completely shifted onto my own children), but hardly ever afraid of my own death. As i approach middle age, I am finding I am both more and more frightened about my own untimely death, while at the same time … more at peace with the idea of my own death. Hard to explain. I like what you mention — the idea of a creative legacy

  2. Irene Lee says:

    I do believe that many of us grow to eventually accept death as how it is. I do feel that I’ve become more matured on the idea. Its funny how I never expressed my fear of death to my parents though. Like how scared I was of the idea. How about you? Does your children express their fears to you?

  3. Woody Potatohead says:

    “All that remains of an individual after their final chapter is their story, a homage to one’s life through the scattered pieces of memories that’s left – letters, photographs, videos, and other remnants of that, once, human being. These are the aspects of your life that eventually live on as you die.”

    Nicely put. I think it’s the “living on” that’s scary. Death was never the terrifying thing, but rather the thought of the people we would leave behind. Here’s something that I’d read, that rings true:

    A little girl asks, “Does it hurt very much to die?”, and the man says, “well, sweetheart. yes, it does but it hurts a lot more to keep living.”

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